Etymology of “tea” // Etymology of “lemon”

A Bit of White Light

Lemon-Ginger-Teas

Here is a description of the etymology of the word “tea” from The Oxford English Dictionary:

“= French thé, Spanish te, Italian , Dutch and German thee, Danish, Swedish te, modern Latin thea; < (perhaps through Malay te, teh) Chinese, Amoy dialect te, in Fuchau tiä = Mandarin ch’a (in ancient Chinese probably kia); whence Portuguese cha, obsolete Spanish cha, obsolete Italian cià, Russian čaj, Persian, Urdu chā (10th cent.), Arabic shāy, Turkish chāy. The Portuguese brought the form cha (which is Cantonese as well as Mandarin) from Macao. This form also passed overland into Russia. The form te (thé) was brought into Europe by the Dutch, probably from the Malay at Bantam (if not from Formosa, where the Fuhkien or Amoy form was used). The original English pronunciation /teː/

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2 comments

  1. Wonderful! Thanks

    1. dr .narayanasamy bhms · · Reply

      see my comments tamil language belongs to dravidian languages mother of all languages see my comments etymology of tea

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